Your Way

Naming your feelings

By 25th May 2020 No Comments

How are you really feeling?

Feelings are characterized as an emotional state, reaction, idea or belief. This means that your feelings can be influenced and are connected to your thoughts. They can be messy, complicated and confusing at times so we’ve put together this blog to help you name and talk about them.

Happiness

Generally, people strive to feel happy but what does being happy mean? For me It’s that good feeling I get when I’ve enjoyed my day or I’m doing something I love.

Labeling your happy feelings will help express yourself and identify things that you can do to boost your mood if you’re feeling low. For example, yesterday I was feeling proud of myself for getting up early to go shopping before starting work. I was also excited to cook lasagne for dinner with the ingredients I picked up.

Now it’s your turn – try explaining how you’re feeling. If you’re not feeling happy today try and identify something that’ll help boost your mood such as doing something you enjoy. Personally, I love being creative which I know is a good feeling so actively doing something creative will help boost my mood when I’m feeling low.

Here’s a list of words to help you describe your happy feelings:

Sadness

Everyone feels sad from time to time. Sometimes these feelings directly relate to a specific event such as loss or rejection but sometimes you might not know why you feel sad and that’s ok.

Labeling your sad feelings will help express yourself, reduce the intensity of your sad feelings and identify things that you can do to boost your mood if you’re feeling low. For example, yesterday when I made my lasagne it didn’t go quite to plan and I was disappointed with the result. When I spoke up about what I was feeling my family made me realise that I should be proud for making it on my own completely from scratch. Now with a few pointers I’m excited to try again and nail it!

Now it’s your turn – try explaining how you’re feeling. If you’re not feeling sad today try and identify the last time you felt sad and try explaining it to someone.

Here’s a list of words to help you describe your sad feelings:

Anger

Many people think anger is a negative thing but it actually helps us to identify problems, things that are hurting us and motivate us to change. Anger can become a problem but only when it gets out of control and harms you or the people around you.

Labelling your anger will help you to express yourself, identify problems and motivate us to change, achieve our goals and move on. For example, I was irritated at the fact that my lasagne wasn’t as good as my dad’s. However, by identifying the problems and ways to improve I’m now excited to try again and nail it!

Now it’s your turn – try explaining how you’re feeling. If you’re not feeling angry today try and identify the last time you felt this way and something that’ll help reduce your angry feelings. Personally, I tend to take a step back and focus on finding a solution.

Here’s a list of words to help you describe your angry feelings:

Fear

Fear is the body’s response to the threat of danger, pain or harm. It’s a useful emotion that allows us to act in dangerous situations. This is called the fight or flight response. We can also experience fear in situations that don’t actually pose a threat to us. If you live with Anxiety you might experience this more often.

Labelling your fearful feelings will help you to express yourself, confront the fear instead of ignoring it and lessen the feeling’s intensity. For example, when I was making my lasagne I was anxious about how it would turn out. I took a moment to figure out why this was and it turns out It was because I hadn’t made one my own completely from scratch before and I wasn’t completely sure of all the steps. To help reduce my anxious feeling I printed out a recipe and kept referring back to it to make sure I was doing the right thing.

Now it’s your turn – try explaining how you’re feeling. If you’re not feeling fearful today try and identify the last time you felt fearful and ways you could reduce this feeling. Personally, I tend to confront these and try to logically think through the situation. This helps me to understand why I’m feeling this way and whether there is anything I can do about it.

Here’s a list of words to help you describe your fearful feelings:

Disgust

Disgust is an emotional response to something unpleasant or offensive. This usually helps protect you and avoid unpleasant situations but it can become a problem if it leads you to dislike yourself or situations that aren’t necessarily bad for you and cause you to withdraw.

Labelling your disgusted feelings will help you to express yourself, approach someone about how their behaviour is making you feel and identify unpleasant situations and ways to avoid these. For example, when I was making my lasagne I was a little uncomfortable because my sister was hovering watching everything I was doing. I approached her and she wasn’t in any way judging me she just wanted to learn how to make it. Now that I understood that I got her to read out the recipe so she was able to help me and learn at the same time.

Now it’s your turn – try explaining how you’re feeling. If you’re not feeling angry today try and identify the last time you felt this way and something that’ll help reduce your angry feelings. Personally, I tend to take a step back and focus on finding a solution.

Here’s a list of words to help you describe your disgusted feelings:

Keep in mind that emotions are there for a reason, even the negative ones. So, don’t try and change the emotions you’re feeling (that’s another form of burying them), try and change the way you react to certain situations. Just because you feel angry doesn’t mean you have to throw something across the room. Try talking about what’s making you angry and find a solution.

P.s If you’re interested in how my lasagne turned out here’s a picture:

Keira

Author Keira

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